Editorial Board

Richard Alba

Richard Alba

Richard Alba is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His focus has been on migration; race and ethnicity; urban sociology; second generation immigrants; and assimilation.

He has been Vice President of the American Sociological Association and President of the Eastern Sociological Society. He recently delivered the Nathan Huggins Lectures at Harvard University which led to the book, Blurring the Color Line: The New Chance for a More Integrated America (Harvard University Press, 2009).

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Jared Aldstadt

Jared Aldstadt

Jared Aldstadt is Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of Buffalo. His research interests are in the areas of medical geography and spatiotemporal analysis.

To this point the intersection of these two areas has led to work on infectious disease dynamics and dengue virus transmission in particular. He uses traditional spatial analysis techniques and develops new methodologies to estimate the parameters of disease transmission.  The emphasis is on gaining a better understanding of disease diffusion under varying environmental conditions and different control efforts.  The goal of this work is to predict disease dynamics under changing environmental constraints and to develop disease reduction strategies that are appropriate for local circumstances.

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Luc Anselin

Luc Anselin

Luc Anselin is Director of the GeoDa Center for Geospatial Analysis and Computation, Regents’ Professor and Walter Isard Chair in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University.

In 2008, he was named to the National Academy of Sciences. His interests are in spatial data analysis and geographic information science, with applications in regional economics, environmental economics, real estate economics as well as in epidemiology, criminology and political science.

Professor Anselin is widely recognized as a leading authority on spatial regression models, leading the development of software packages to estimate them on personal computers.

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Deborah Balk

Deborah Balk

Deborah Balk is Associate Director of the CUNY Institute for Demographic Research, and Professor at the Baruch School of Public Affairs and the CUNY Graduate Center (in the Sociology and Economics Programs). Her expertise lies in spatial demography and the integration of earth and social science data and methods to address interdisciplinary policy questions. Her current research focus is on urbanization, population, poverty, and environmental interactions (such as climate change).

Prior to coming to Baruch, Balk held appointments at Columbia University, the East-West Center, and the University of Michigan. She is currently a member of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population working group on Urbanization and recently completed service to two National Research Council panels.

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Andrew Beveridge

Andrew Beveridge

Andrew A. Beveridge , President and CEO of Social Explorer, is a Professor and Chair of Sociology at Queens College and the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York. Since 1993, He has been a consultant to the New York Times, which has published numerous news reports and maps based upon his analysis of Census data. He writes the demographic topic column for the Gotham Gazette.

He has taught in the Sociology Department of Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. and M.Phil. in sociology from Yale University and his B.A with honors in economics from Yale College. His research work has received grant and fellowship support from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Philosophical Society, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Putnam Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and other agencies.

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Marcia Caldas de Castro

Marcia Caldas de Castro

Marcia Castro is Assistant Professor of Demography, Department of Global Health and Population, and a member of the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) User Working Group. At Harvard, she is a member of the Center for Geographic Analysis (CGA) Steering Committee, and faculty sponsor of the Spatial Analysis Methods Student Working Group.

Dr. Castro believes that spatial techniques have the potential to unravel important associations in a variety of social phenomena, producing crucial knowledge, and facilitating the translation of this knowledge into better policies. She has used spatial methods in her research to describe, explore, and model spatial patterns of demographic indicators and of vector-borne disease transmission.

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Feinian Chen

Feinian Chen

Feinian Chen received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2001 and was trained in social demography at the Carolina Population Center.

Her research crosscuts a range of areas in demography, family sociology, aging, and quantitative methodology. Four major lines of work include women’s work and family, intergenerational relations, population aging and health, and simulation studies of structural equation models.

Professor Chen’s work has been published in the American Sociological Review, Social Forces,Demography, Population Studies, andSociological Methods and Research. She has received five years of funding for research on grandparents’ caregiving in China as a Mentored Research Career Award (K01) from the National Institutes of Health.

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Guangqing Chi

Guangqing Chi

Guangqing Chi is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Research Scientist at the Social Science Research Center at Mississippi State University.

His program of research examines the interactions between human population and the built and natural environments.  He has been pursuing this objective through three interwoven areas of research which include transportation-demographic dynamics, population-environment interactions, and population estimation and forecasting.  The three areas of research build upon his methodological strengths in spatial analysis and statistics.

In 2007, he received the Walter E. Terrie Award from the Southern Demographic Association for his development of spatial regression models for small-area population forecasting.   His current project investigates the role that gasoline prices play in affecting commuting behaviors, residential relocation, and traffic levels.

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Dustin T. Duncan

Dustin T. Duncan

Dustin T. Duncan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Health at New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Duncan is a social and spatial epidemiologist, studying how neighborhood characteristics (such as the built environment including parks and community design features and the social environment including crime and violence) influence population health (especially obesity prevention) among children, adolescents and their families. He has a special emphasis on minority health and health disparities. Dr. Duncan also studies socio-demographic disparities in neighborhood environmental features related to population health and community wellbeing. His research has a strong domestic (U.S.) focus, but recent work is beginning to span across the globe. Methodologically, his research utilizes a geospatial lens to apply spatially explicit approaches such as computer-based geographic information systems, web-based geospatial technologies, real-time geospatial technologies and geospatial modeling techniques. Dr. Duncan’s work appears in leading public health, medical, geography, criminology and demography journals. He has over 25 publications and book chapters. Dr. Duncan completed his doctorate and the Alonzo Smythe Yerby Postdoctoral Fellowship, both in Social Epidemiology, at Harvard University School of Public Health.

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Carson Farmer

Carson Farmer

Carson J. Q. Farmer is an assistant professor of GIScience at Hunter College – City University of New York (CUNY) and deputy director of the Center for Advanced Research of Spatial Information (CARSI). His research interests span a wide range of topics in computational social science, with a focus on spatial-temporal dynamics, complexity, and spatial interaction. His recent research examined the impact of commuting flows on the formation of local labor markets, and highlighted the necessity of considering commuting within the context of local labor market spatial structure. Carson holds a PhD in Geocomputation from the National University of Ireland Maynooth, where he specialized in spatial statistics, geographic information science, and travel-to-work. He has made significant contributions to the open-source GIS platform, QGIS, and continues to develop novel spatial analysis methods and open source software for solving complex spatial problems.

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Mark Fossett

Mark Fossett

Mark Fossett is Professor, Department Head, and Graduate Advisor in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. He is also a Research Affiliate of the Race & Ethnic Studies Institute where he has created computer simulations of racial and ethnics population segregation dynamics using GIS visualization techniques.

His other academic foci are in Racial and Ethnic Relations, Social Inequality, Social Demography, and Urban Sociology.

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A. Stuart Fotheringham

A. Stuart Fotheringham

A. Stewart Fotheringham is Director of the Centre for GeoInformatics and Professor of Human Geography in the School of Geography and Geosciences at the University of St Andrews.  He has long-held interests and expertise in geographic information science, spatial data analysis and spatial modelling and has been actively involved with large GIS-based initiatives in the US, Canada, the UK and Ireland.

Professor Fotheringham’s research expertise is in the analysis of spatial data and in particular the local modelling of spatial relationships with geographically weighted regression, for which he has co-authored software that has been distributed to a wide variety of agencies and individuals concerned with spatial modelling as documented in Geographically Weighted Regression: An Analysis of Spatially Varying Relationships.

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Michael Goodchild

Michael Goodchild

Michael F. Goodchild is Emeritus Professor of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he also holds the title of Research Professor. He also holds an affiliate appointment in the Department of Geography at the University of Washington.

Until his retirement in June 2012 he was Jack and Laura Dangermond Professor of Geography, and Director of UCSB’s Center for Spatial Studies. He received his BA degree from Cambridge University in Physics in 1965 and his PhD in geography from McMaster University in 1969, and has received four honorary doctorates. He was elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and Foreign Member of the Royal Society of Canada in 2002, member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2006, and Foreign Member of the Royal Society and Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy in 2010; and in 2007 he received the Prix Vautrin Lud. He was editor of Geographical Analysis between 1987 and 1990 and editor of the Methods, Models, and Geographic Information Sciences section of the Annals of the Association of American Geographers from 2000 to 2006. He serves on the editorial boards of ten other journals and book series, and has published over 15 books and 500 articles. He was Chair of the National Research Council’s Mapping Science Committee from 1997 to 1999, and of the Advisory Committee on Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences of the National Science Foundation from 2008 to 2010. His research interests center on geographic information science, spatial analysis, and uncertainty in geographic data.

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Donald Janelle

Donald Janelle

Donald G. Janelle is a Research Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He serves as Program Director for the Center for Spatial Studies (spatial@ucsb) and for the Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science (CSISS).

He was on the faculty of the U.S. Air Force Academy for four years and on the faculty of the University of Western Ontario for 30 years, where he chaired the Department of Geography for five years and served as Assistant Vice Provost. He edited The Canadian Geographer, the official refereed journal of the Canadian Association of Geographers, and chaired the Publications Committee for the Association of American Geographers.

Janelle’s research and publications are based broadly within geography and affiliated social and behavioral sciences. Primary themes include space-time analyses of individual behavior, the time-geography of cities, the temporal-spatial ordering of social systems, locational conflict analysis, social issues in transportation, and the role of space-adjusting technologies in structuring new patterns of social and economic organization.

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Andrew Lawson

Andrew Lawson

Andrew B. Lawson is Professor in the Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Epidemiology Department at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, SC.

His research interests lie in the area of spatial and environmental statistics, and in particular, spatio-environmental epidemiology. This area includes disease mapping, ecological analysis, and the analysis of clustering of disease. He also has interests in other areas of epidemiology, directional data analysis, and object recognition from imaging and geostatistical estimation of random fields with applications in geology, geosciences and medical science. Dr. Lawson is a WHO advisor in Disease Mapping and Risk Assessment, and has a wide range of publications in this area.

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John Logan

John Logan

John R. Logan is Professor of Sociology and Director of the S4 initiative at Brown University. He came to Brown University in Fall 2004, after 24 years at the University at Albany, where he served as Chair of the Department of Sociology, Director of the Lewis Mumford Center, and Director of the Center for Social and Demographic Analysis. Dr. Logan is co-author, along with Harvey Molotch, of Urban Fortunes: The Political Economy of Place. His most recent edited book, Urban China in Transition, was published by Blackwell in 2007.

Dr. Logan is pursuing several different research projects. For several years he has been gathering data on neighborhood change and individual mobility in U.S. cities in the period 1880-1920.

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Steven Murdock

Steven Murdock

Steven H. Murdock is the founding Director of the Hobby Center for the Study of Texas, Dr. Murdock holds the Allyn and Gladys Cline Chair in Sociology at Rice University.  He is the former Director of the U.S. Census Bureau, The State Demographer of Texas, holder of a Regents Chair at Texas A&M University, The Lutcher Brown Distinguished Chair in Demography and Organization Studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and a noted scholar with 13 books and more than 150 articles and analytical reports.

He is also noted in applied and Texas governmental circles having been named as one of the 50 most influential Texans by Texas Business in 1997 and one of the 25 most influential Texans by Texas Monthly in 2005.  He has extensive experience in research on a wide variety of issues impacting Texas and is widely known as a national expert in the areas of Demography, Rural Sociology and Socioeconomic Impact Assessment.

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Sergio Rey

Sergio Rey

Sergio J. Rey is Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning and Affiliate, GeoDa Center for Geospatial Analysis and Computation at Arizona State University. He formerly served as Chair, Department of Geography, Co-director, Center For Earth Systems Analysis Research (CESAR), and Director, Regional Analysis Laboratory (REGAL) at San Diego State University.

His research Interests include open source geocomputation, spatial econometrics, spatial data analysis, economic geography, integrated multiregional modeling, and regional science. Dr. Rey’s work on the software package Space-Time Analysis of Regional Systems (STARS) is widely used as is the newly released platform, PySal (with Luc Anselin).

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Gerald Rushton

Gerald Rushton

Gerard Rushton is Professor in the Geography Department at the University of Iowa. He teaches a variety of courses involving health and geography, including Location Models and Spatial Decision Support Systems, Geography of Health, Advanced Location Theory, Spatial Analysis of Health, and Location-allocation models.

He is interested in the development of human service systems in both developed and developing country contexts, particularly for health services. Dr. Rushton’s research also focuses on the spatial analysis of disease burdens. Modeling areas include location-allocation, small area demographics, spatial choice behavior, disease cluster analysis, spatial aggregation and disaggregation. Most importantly, he is interested in integrating such methods in geographic information systems and has published widely in this genre of work.

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Stuart Sweeney

Stuart Sweeney

Stuart H. Sweeney is Associate Professor, Vice Chair, and Graduate Advisor in the Department of Geography at the University of California at Santa Barbara.  After earning a BA from UC San Diego, he completed his Ph.D. (1999) in City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

His diverse academic research interests span topics from applied statistics, spatial analysis, economic geography, demography, and development.  In addition to academic research, he consults for government agencies; most recently developing small area population and enrollment projections for the Southern California Association of Governments.

Professor Sweeney teaches courses such as Introduction to Geographic Data Analysis, Urban Geography, Human Migration, the Introduction to Geographic Data Analysis, Urban and Regional Modeling and Planning, Methods of Regional Analysis, and Migration Models.

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Charles Tolbert II

Charles Tolbert II

Charles M. Tolbert II is Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology, at Baylor University. He is Past-President of the Southern Demographic Association. Dr. Tolbert is Principal of Strategic Demographics LLC, a spatial analysis consulting company.

He has been involved with graduate education since 1980 and came to Baylor in 2000. He returned to his alma mater (class of 1973) nearly 25 years later to build on the potential of the the small and highly effective applied sociology doctoral program as chair of the sociology department. His areas of research include social stratification, social demography, rural sociology and quantitative applications. He teaches basic data analysis, advanced quantitative methods, and demographic techniques.

He has an extensive publication record and one of the first to use a secure data center of the US. Bureau of the Census under Special Sworn Status. Examining large, complex data-sets have been part of his research from his graduate school training. His well-received book, Introduction to Computing: Applications for the Social Sciences (Addison-Wesley) in 1985 proved foretelling of the computer revolution to come.

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Kenneth Wachter

Kenneth Wachter

Kenneth W. Wachter is interested in applications of spatial statistical methods and stochastic geometry, small area estimation,  neighborhood effects,  housing, diffusion models,  and intergenerational mobility. He teaches in the Departments of Demography and Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley.

He is credited with empowering the area of spatial demography through his 2005 article, “Spatial Demography,” appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which prefaced seven papers on the topic.

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David Wong

David Wong

David Wong is Professor in the Department of Geography and GeoInformation Science at George Mason University.

While he has broad interest in GIS and spatial analysis-statistics, Dr. Wong’s specific research areas related to spatial demography are the spatial dimensions of segregation and ethnic diversity, spatial epidemiology and public health, and the use of census data, particularly the American Community Survey (ACS) data, in GIS. His book, Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Geographic Information (Wiley) with J. Lee is a widely used textbook in the social sciences.

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