Area Editors

Book Review Editor

Stephen A. Matthews

Stephen A. Matthews

Stephen A. Matthews is Associate Professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Demography (Courtesy Geography) and the academic director of the Geographic Information Analysis Core in the Population Research Institute and Social Science Research Institute at Penn State.

The central tenets of his teaching and research scholarship are population health and health inequality in diverse community contexts. The substantive focus of his research is the study of resources, risks, and opportunities (e.g., food, pollution, social networks) and how access and utilization of these resources, risks, and opportunities relate to health and social inequality (e.g., diet, obesity status, other health outcomes). Race/ethnicity and income inequality are cross-cutting themes in his research. He is also interested in conceptual and methodological issues associated with how neighborhoods are defined and their attributes are measured, and the relevance of these definitions/measures to individual behavior and health outcomes.

Earlier this year he co-edited with Linda Burton, Susan Kemp, ManChui Lueng and David Takeuchi, Communities, Neighborhoods, and Health: Expanding the Boundaries of Place and co-authored with Wilbur Zelinsky, The Place of Religion in Chicago.

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Teaching and Learning Editor

Paul R. Voss

Paul R. Voss

Paul R. Voss has spent the majority of his career as an applied demographic analyst focusing on population growth and distribution and the implications of demographic change for geographic locations and regions. He holds a PhD in sociology and demography from the University of Michigan, and for many years was the director of the Applied Population Laboratory (APL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He established and led the early introduction of spatial tools, data and perspectives into APL programming and oversaw the support and outreach of spatial services to other units on the Wisconsin campus, in particular to the Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology.

He presently is a Faculty Fellow at the Carolina Population Center (CPC), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) where he serves as faculty advisor to the CPC Spatial Analysis Unit. He also holds the title of Senior Spatial Analyst at the UNC-CH Odum Institute for Research in Social Science. He is Professor Emeritus in the University of Wisconsin’s Department of Community and Environmental Science.

Over the past 12-15 years, he has maintained an active research program and teaching interest in the area of spatial demography. He has served as consultant to the U.S. Census Bureau on methodology and applications of the American Community Survey and has served on several scientific panels with the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Software and Code Editor

Corey S. Sparks

Corey S. Sparks

Corey S. Sparks is Assistant Professor of Demography and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology University of Texas Health Science Center at the University of Texas-San Antonio.

His research focuses on statistical demography, Geographic Information Systems and recently a foray into Bayesian Statistics.Substantively, he is interested in human health and reproduction and the application of modern statistical methods to problems in demography and health.

Dr. Sparks’ teaching is primarily focused on the use and application of advanced statistical techniques including hazards analysis, multivariate methods and spatial statistics in human population analysis.

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Spatial Data Editor

Lee Rivers Mobley

Lee Rivers Mobley

Lee Rivers Mobley is an Associate Professor of Spatial Science and Health Economics in the Institute of Public Health, at Georgia State University. Prior to this appointment, she was a Research Professor of Spatial Science and Health Economics in the GeoDa Center at Arizona State University, and had served as a Senior Research Fellow at RTI International for about 11 years. While at RTI, she spearheaded the effort to establish a Census Research Data Center (RDC) lab on the RTI main campus. Under the auspices of her approved Census RDC project (#796 – “Methodologies for Analyzing Risk Assessment”), she begun various studies of community risk and resilience using restricted microdata. A renewal of her R01 grant with NIH/NCI will allow her team to study cancer incidence and outcomes at small geographic scales across the entire US, under a National Centers for Health Statistics approval for this work, to be conducted inside RDCs. Under the parent grant, the GeoDa Center at ASU established OpenGeoDa spatial analytic software on the Census Linux server for use by all researchers inside RDCs, making spatial analytic capabilities on the restricted microdata available for the first time.

She has more than 20 years of experience in conducting health market and health outcomes studies using spatial analytic methods. Her research includes analyses of disparities among populations and across geography, examining socio-ecological problems where place and space are important; studies in spatial demography; and analysis of health care markets and behaviors of both consumers and providers. Her publications have included hospital antitrust studies, studies of insurance market competition, market analysis for several Medicare reform initiatives, spatial analysis explaining cardiac risk factors in low income women, analysis of the spatial diffusion of endoscopy services, spatial analysis of access to and quality of preventive care services used by the elderly, and ecological analysis of the spread of HIV among injection drug users in San Francisco. She has earned recognition as an expert in applied spatial analysis, with over 50 peer-reviewed publications, and is honored to serve as the Spatial Data Editor for Spatial Demography.

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